When Parliaments Go to War
When Parliaments Go to War

US War Powers in Comparative Perspective

by Eric Langland | United States of America, Organization of Military Defence

Unlike the German and British parliaments, the US Congress has thus far failed to bring to a vote an authorization for the use of force in Syria against ISIS. Instead, President Obama must rely on a broad interpretation of his constitutional authority as commander-in-chief. Eric Langland argues that only a vote will give appropriate legitimacy to US military action in Syria, demonstrate popular support, and give Congress a critical opportunity to shape military policy.

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Publication

Insecurity in Sinai and Beyond
Insecurity in Sinai and Beyond

Why the Egyptian Counterterrorism Strategy is Failing

by Helena Burgrova | Egypt, Terrorism

As the world marks the fifth anniversary of the protest that launched the Egyptian uprising, Egypt’s military-led government is undertaking heavy-handed counterterrorism measures in the Sinai Peninsula as part of its broad-gauged “war on terror.” Yet Wilayat Sinai, the most active armed group in Egypt today, has claimed responsibility for an array of deadly attacks, including the October 2015 downing of a Russian charter plane. Why has Cairo failed so spectacularly to contain Sinai-based terror?

Publication

The Engagement of Arab Gulf States in Egypt and Tunisia since 2011
The Engagement of Arab Gulf States in Egypt and Tunisia since 2011

Rationale and Impact

by Sebastian Sons, Inken Wiese | Near and Middle East/North Africa, Democratization/System Change

After the 2011 upheavals in Egypt and Tunisia, political and economic assistance provided to the two countries by Saudi Arabia, the UAE, and Qatar was largely meant to stabilize matters economically. This study documents the nature of Gulf assistance and analyzes its impact on political and economic development in Egypt and Tunisia, particularly on democratization and inclusive socioeconomic change. There is potential for synergy between Arab and Western donor countries, but it remains untapped.

Publication

Perception and Exploitation
Perception and Exploitation

Russia’s non-military influence in Europe

by Stefan Meister, Jana Puglierin | Russia, Media/Information

This text introduces a series of articles exploring Russia’s use of instruments of hybrid warfare since the Ukraine crisis and the annexation of Crimea. These tools include not only putting “little green men” on the ground in eastern Ukraine but also robust media propaganda and – significantly – support for Euroskepticism within the EU. Stefan Meister and Jana Puglierin frame the initial discussion here. Subsequent texts will consider Serbia, Greece, France, Hungary, and elsewhere in Europe.

Publication

Headed for Brussels without a Compass
Headed for Brussels without a Compass

Serbia's Position between Rapprochement with the EU and Russian Influence

by Sarah Wohlfeld | Serbia, European Union

This December Serbia opened the first of 35 accession chapters with the EU. The prospect of EU membership continues to attract broad support in the population. However, the Kremlin also carries considerable weight in Serbian public opinion. It does so by stressing the common Slavic identity of the two nations, drawing on shared anti-Western resentment, and making a point of supporting Serbia on the matter of Kosovo. Sarah Wohlfeld continues the DGAP’s series on Russia’s “soft” influence in Europe.

External Publication

The Saudi-Iranian Conflict
The Saudi-Iranian Conflict

What are the roots of the rivalry and what are its consequences?

by Ali Fathollah-Nejad, Sebastian Sons | Iran, Security

What effect will the escalation between the two regional powers have on the Middle East’s multiple crises? How much influence does the West have, and where does it position itself between its recent rapprochement with Iran and its “business-as-usual” approach toward the Saudis? DGAP associate fellows Ali Fathollah-Nejad and Sebastian Sons discuss geopolitical goals, domestic power considerations, and the exploitation of religion. Translated by Imogen Taylor.

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