Theses for a New German Policy toward Russia
Theses for a New German Policy toward Russia

Nine Recommendations

by Stefan Meister | Russia, Bilateral Relations

Russia has seen the dramatic securitization of its politics, economy, and society since 2012. For Russian leaders, struggle with the West has served as a means of underpinning their power and their system. As the domestic economic situation worsens and nationalistic forces gather strength, the danger of further destabilization grows more acute. For German and European policy to exert effective influence in the medium and long term, it must apply a complex combination of containment and cooperation.

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Workshop

New Enemies, New Alliances?

The impact and potential of the international coalition against ISIS

DGAP | Security

What impact will the US-led coalition against ISIS have on the Middle East? The interests of the coalition participants are sometimes at odds. Who is taking part and why? Do they share other goals apart from fighting ISIS? Could this become a proxy war between Saudi Arabia and Iran? Should NATO be involved? These were some of the questions addressed during a day-long workshop organized by the DGAP’s Transatlantic Relations program.

Viewpoint

Russia Should Rethink Victory Day
Russia Should Rethink Victory Day

The country should reconsider how it marks the seventieth anniversary of the victory over Germany

by Wladislaw Inosemzew | Russia, History

World War II was a huge and unforgettable tragedy for the Soviet people. Yet the Germany of World War II no longer exists in its former configuration, and the tactical and strategic lessons of that war lost relevance long ago. The most appropriate way to characterize that conflict is as an enormous human tragedy. Victory Day would best be celebrated not by glorifying the state but by mourning the victims of War. Reprinted with kind permission from the Moscow Times.

Further Publications

How Russia Lost Germany (and How it Can Win It Back)
How Russia Lost Germany (and How it Can Win It Back)

EU foreign policy and the Ukraine crisis

by Stefan Meister | Russia, European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP)

The growing politicization and securitization of all areas of German-Russian relations marks the end of Germany’s post-Cold-War Eastern policy. Returning to business as usual is now utterly impossible on both sides. But there is a positive side to this reality check: an end to German naïveté about Russia. Stefan Meister's article in the current issue of Russia and Global Affairs, published by the Foreign Policy Research Foundation.

Publication

A Semi-professional Military
A Semi-professional Military

Problems Facing Russian Armed Forces in the Effort to Transition to a Contract Army

by Andrey Kalikh | Russia, Armed Forces

Russia’s military still has many Soviet-era features: mass character, low mobility, and staggering cost. But it is also modernizing. Efforts to replace compulsory military service with a professional army have had only halting success at best, but some results are clear. In 2008, it took two weeks for Russian forces to reach South Ossetia. Things were quite different on the border with Ukraine in 2014; professional soldiers were deployed to Russia’s southern Rostov region in a matter of days.

Viewpoint

TTIP: Winning Back Trust
TTIP: Winning Back Trust

The EU Commission should take concrete steps to address the public’s concerns

by Claudia Schmucker | Europe, Free Trade

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, if signed, would create the world’s largest economic zone. But its supporters face a credibility problem: ever more Europeans, especially Germans, see in TTIP a threat to their way of life, and to democracy – a “secret treaty” that protects corporate interests while undermining high European standards for the environment, health and consumer protection. Here are five issues the EU Commission and German government must address to win back public trust.

Events

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