Robert Bosch Center for Central and Eastern Europe, Russia, and Central Asia

The Robert Bosch Center for Central and Eastern Europe, Russia, and Central Asia sees itself as a central point of contact on matters relating to the European Union’s and Germany’s relations with Central and Eastern Europe as well as the whole post-Soviet region.

The great importance of Russia to the EU and Germany in terms of security, energy, and economic policy makes the country an area of particular focus for the center. The states of the EU’s Eastern Partnership – Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, and Ukraine – together form another key working area. The ongoing processes of reform and transformation taking place there are vital to the EU’s Neighborhood Policy, as are the relations of these countries with both the EU and Russia. It is in the same spirit that the DGAP draws the countries of Central Asia into its activities. In addition, the center continues its work on the EU’s Central European states, and the Visegrad states in particular (Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary). The post-socialist transformation of these states and their integration into European and transatlantic structures remain subjects of significant interest.

The program’s tasks include providing and distributing effective advice and analysis to the policy, business, media, and expert communities by means of carefully tailored target groups. The center also serves as an active platform for figures from policy, business, academia, and civil society and develops and cultivates networks in its target countries. In doing so, the center combines

  • scholarly expertise and analysis
  • policy advice for German decision makers
  • events (conferences, strategy debates, background discussions, briefings, etc.)
  • publications (analysis, policy papers, position papers, etc.)
  • network building activities (academia, policy, media, business, and civil society)
  • and international cooperation.

 

Publications

  • Searching for a new foundation for German-Russian relations

    von Stefan Meister | Russia
    Russian International Affairs Council, May 14, 2018

    Relations between Germany and Russia have always been fundamental for (peace and stability) Europe — whether in a negative way, for example remembering the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact on the eve of the Second World War, or in a positive way, as in the management of German unification, the end of the Soviet Union and the eastern enlargement of the EU.

  • Orbán Reloaded

    What the EU and Germany Should Do Now

    von Milan Nič, Péter Krekó | Hungary, Elections
    DGAPviewpoint 10, 2018, 4 pp.

    Orbán Reloaded

    Viktor Orbán has been re-elected as Hungarian prime minister in polls beset by fear-mongering, an unfair voting system and a divided opposition. After decrying the EU as part of a Western conspiracy against Hungary, he will now both use and abuse Brussels: He hopes to build a new Eurosceptic alliance in Brussels to increase his limited clout in the bloc and his power and maneuver space at home. The EU should step up its responses to prevent Hungary from becoming an antidemocratic model in Europe.

  • Stably Instable

    Putin’s Reelection Will Not Stop Social Change in Russia

    von Stefan Meister | Russia, Elections
    DGAPviewpoint 9, 2018, 3 pp.

    Stably Instable

    Vladimir Putin has governed Russia for eighteen years. An entire generation of young Russians has only ever experienced him at the helm of their country. Yet, it is just this generation that Putin is losing touch with as he has been seeking his power base mostly in the conservative, small-town and rural majority. Putin’s reelection will not shield his government from the social change that Russia is facing – and it is this change that the West should set its hopes on.

Events

Events