Robert Bosch Center for Central and Eastern Europe, Russia, and Central Asia

The Robert Bosch Center for Central and Eastern Europe, Russia, and Central Asia sees itself as a central point of contact on matters relating to the European Union’s and Germany’s relations with Central and Eastern Europe as well as the whole post-Soviet region.

The great importance of Russia to the EU and Germany in terms of security, energy, and economic policy makes the country an area of particular focus for the center. The states of the EU’s Eastern Partnership – Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, and Ukraine – together form another key working area. The ongoing processes of reform and transformation taking place there are vital to the EU’s Neighborhood Policy, as are the relations of these countries with both the EU and Russia. It is in the same spirit that the DGAP draws the countries of Central Asia into its activities. In addition, the center continues its work on the EU’s Central European states, and the Visegrad states in particular (Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary). The post-socialist transformation of these states and their integration into European and transatlantic structures remain subjects of significant interest.

The program’s tasks include providing and distributing effective advice and analysis to the policy, business, media, and expert communities by means of carefully tailored target groups. The center also serves as an active platform for figures from policy, business, academia, and civil society and develops and cultivates networks in its target countries. In doing so, the center combines

  • scholarly expertise and analysis
  • policy advice for German decision makers
  • events (conferences, strategy debates, background discussions, briefings, etc.)
  • publications (analysis, policy papers, position papers, etc.)
  • network building activities (academia, policy, media, business, and civil society)
  • and international cooperation.

 

Publications

  • Security First, Technology Second

    Putin Tightens his Grip on Russia’s Internet – with China’s Help

    von Andrei Soldatov | Russia, Cyber Security
    DGAPkompakt 3, 7. März 2019, 5 S.

    Security First, Technology Second

    Since his return to the Russian presidency in 2012, Vladimir Putin has sought to bring the Russian internet under his control. Digital businesses in Russia pay dearly for his expensive system of surveillance and censorship. This slows down the pace of innovation and puts the modernization of the economy at risk. Even then, technical control over the internet remains shaky. The Kremlin is seeking Chinese assistance to enforce restrictions and be able to cut Russia off from the global internet.

  • Armenia Needs a New Opposition

    How the EU Can Help Institute Checks and Balances

    von Cristina Gherasimov | Armenia
    DGAPstandpunkt 6, March 6, 2019, 3 pp.

    Armenia Needs a New Opposition

    In Armenia, last year’s Velvet Revolution ended a long period of autocratic rule. On assuming the office of prime minister, former opposition leader Nikol Pashinyan acquired a constitutional authority enhanced by wide popular support and the lack of effective opposition in parliament. While this helps him implement reforms, the absence of strong checks may prove harmful in the long run. The EU should help rebuild Armenia’s checks and balances to ensure the country’s sustainable transformation.

  • Moldova’s Weak Democracy Is a Growing Risk for Europe

    von Cristina Gherasimov | Moldova, Elections
    First published as Expert Comment, Chatham House, February 26, 2019

    The country’s politics have been captured by a corrupt elite, creating a worrying security risk on the edge of Europe.

Events

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