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Now is the Time!
Now is the Time! The Western Balkans Need a Clear EU Perspective
by Sarah Wohlfeld
DGAPstandpunkt 8, 2016, 2 pp.
The Brexit referendum means that the EU will have to devote tremendous energy in the coming years to its own internal debates and to the thorny work of determining the future of European integration. With this internal focus, the appetite for enlarging the EU to the states of the Western Balkans is receding into the far distance. If real membership prospects for these states vanish, however, democracy and peace in the entire region could experience dangerous setbacks.
Western Strategy toward Russia and the Post-Soviet Space
Western Strategy toward Russia and the Post-Soviet Space Chapter Seven of The Eastern Question Russia, the West, and Europe’s Grey Zone, a DGAP co-publication
by William Courtney
Chapter 7 (17 pp.) of The Eastern Question: Russia, the West, and Europe’s Grey Zone, co-published by the Center for Transatlantic Relations, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University and the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP), 2016, 264 pp. The publication was generously supported by the Robert Bosch Stiftung.
Although authoritarian rule in most of the post-Soviet space is a frustration, the West does too little to nurture positive change and productive ties. The West will best serve its interests by encouraging reform, building links with civil society, fostering economic opportunity, and assisting states with geopolitical challenges that they are less able to manage on their own, such as security threats, frozen conflicts, and regional power shifts
Western Strategy toward Russia: A Russian’s Perspective
Western Strategy toward Russia: A Russian’s PerspectiveChapter Six of The Eastern Question Russia, the West, and Europe’s Grey Zone, a DGAP co-publication
by Sergei Guriev
Chapter 6 (8 pp.) of The Eastern Question: Russia, the West, and Europe’s Grey Zone, co-published by the Center for Transatlantic Relations, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University and the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP), 2016, 264 pp. The publication was generously supported by the Robert Bosch Stiftung.
The author, Sergei Guriev, strongly believe that only Russians, and not outsiders can turn Russia into a more peaceful, democratic, and prosperous country. On the other hand, he thinks that a more informed policy debate would be in everyone’s interest. Here he offers a few arguments that may be useful for Western policy makers and policy advisors to take into account when developing their policies and strategies.
Germany and the EU: The New Disenchantment
Germany's new focus on rule-based leadership in the EU
by Julie Hamann, Julian Rappold
"EU Forum" blog, Clingendael, Netherlands Institute of International Relations, June 22, 2016
European integration has defined Germany's post-war politics. Now, with waning enthusiasm for the EU but continued overlap between German and European interests, Germany is focusing on a EU rule- based leadership. Julie Hamann and Julian Rappold contributed this blog to Clingendael, Netherlands Institute of International Relations
Brexit and the Shape of EU Power to Come
Brexit and the Shape of EU Power to ComeHow is Britain’s vote to leave the UK going to affect the EU and its weight in the rest of the world?
by Claire Demesmay, Stefan Meister, Jana Puglierin, Julian Rappold, Henning Riecke, Eberhard Sandschneider, Gereon Schuch
What will the effects of Brexit be on the balance of power within the EU, particular between Germany and France? How have the Visegrad States responded? Does Brexit Represent a Victory for Putin? What does Brexit mean for security cooperation between the US and the EU? And what about China? We asked DGAP experts to weigh in.
The European Union Grapples with Brexit
The European Union Grapples with BrexitKeep Calm and Carry On – But How?
by Jana Puglierin, Julian Rappold
DGAPstandpunkt 5 (June 2016), 3 pp.
Whether the rest of the European Union can come together in the face of the stunning outcome of the United Kingdom’s referendum will depend substantially on German leadership
The West and Russia: From Acute Conflict to Long-Term Crisis Management
The West and Russia: From Acute Conflict to Long-Term Crisis ManagementChapter Five of The Eastern Question Russia, the West, and Europe’s Grey Zone, a DGAP co-publication
by Marie Mendras
Chapter 5 of The Eastern Question: Russia, the West, and Europe’s Grey Zone, co-published by the Center for Transatlantic Relations, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University and the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP), 2016, 264 pp. The publication was generously supported by the Robert Bosch Stiftung.
This chapter makes three major observations pertaining to Russia and Vladimir Putin’s future policies and offers three suggestions for how Western governments can respond, including, among other things, preparing for a post-Putin Russia that will be dysfunctional and divided.
Russia and the West:
What Went Wrong and Can We Do Better?
Chapter Four of The Eastern Question Russia, the West, and Europe’s Grey Zone, a DGAP co-publication
by Marek Menkiszak
Chapter 4 of The Eastern Question: Russia, the West, and Europe’s Grey Zone, co-published by the Center for Transatlantic Relations, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University and the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP), 2016, 264 pp. The publication was generously supported by the Robert Bosch Stiftung.
However grave the current crisis in Russian-Western relations may be, recent events are but part of a series of crises between Russia and the West over the 25 years since the breakup of the Soviet Union. But the past quarter century has also seen periods of quite positive, pragmatic cooperation between the two sides. Unfortunately, none of these lasted long – certainly not long enough to allow for a positive breakthrough in mutual relations.
Germany’s Vote to Strike ISIS in Syria
Germany’s Vote to Strike ISIS in SyriaSignalling a shift in its approach to international law
by Eric Langland
DGAPkompakt 14 (June 2016), 5 pp.
After the terrorist attacks in Paris in November, President Hollande somewhat surprisingly invoked Article 42.7 of the Lisbon Treaty – the EU’s mutual assistance clause – instead of NATO’s Article 5 to win European support for the military campaign against ISIS in Syria. Germany’s Bundestag answered the call, voting in December to authorize military support. By championing Lisbon’s assistance clause, Germany sent a clear signal to its fellow member states in support of European common defense.
Ukraine, Russia and the EU
Breaking the deadlock in the Minsk process
by Stefan Meister, Hrant Kostanyan
Stefan Meister and Hrant Kostanyan, CEPS Working Document 423 (June 2016), 17pp. Link shared with kind permission from the Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), Brussels.
At the end of June, when EU heads of state meet to discuss the extension of sanctions against Russia, they should bear in mind that Russia did not implement the commitments it took upon itself in the framework of the Minsk agreements. Given the deadlock in the Ukraine crisis, EU leaders should agree to prolong the sanctions against Russia, push for the renegotiation of the Minsk II Agreement, widen the "Normandy format" to include the US, and bolster reforms in Ukraine.
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