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The Eastern Question: Recommendations for Western Policy
The Eastern Question: Recommendations for Western PolicyForthcoming publication from SAIS's Center for Transatlantic Relations and DGAP
by Daniel Hamilton, Stefan Meister
The Eastern Question: Russia, the West, and Europe’s Grey Zone, Center for Transatlantic Relations, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University and the German Council on Foreign Relations/ Deutsche Gesellschaft für Auswärtige Politik, 2016, 264 pp. This publication was generously supported by the Robert Bosch Stiftung.
Developments across Europe’s east are testing assumptions that have guided Western policies for 25 years. The Transatlantic Strategy Group brought together analysts and decision makers to build Western awareness, understanding and—where possible—consensus on Eastern policy. Senior officials, experts, scholars, and foreign policy strategists took part in a series of consultations in Kiev, Moscow, Berlin, and Washington. The forthcoming volume presents their insights and recommendations.
Eastern Challenges
Eastern ChallengesChapter One from The Eastern Question: Russia, the West, and Europe’s Grey Zone, a DGAP co-publication
by Daniel Hamilton, Stefan Meister
Chapter One of The Eastern Question: Russia, the West, and Europe’s Grey Zone, a new book co-published by the Center for Transatlantic Relations, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University and the German Council on Foreign Relations/ Deutsche Gesellschaft für Auswärtige Politik, 2016, 264 pp.
Russia under Putin is an authoritarian system cloaked in the trappings of “democracy” yet run by a kleptocratic oligarchy that excludes all but a few insiders from political power and uses administrative resources to enrich itself and to control or suppress media, opposition and civil society. The DGAP is pleased to present the first chapter of its co-publication with the Center for Transatlantic Relations, Johns Hopkins University. This book was generously supported by the Robert Bosch Stiftung.
Western Dilemmas
Western DilemmasChapter Two from The Eastern Question: Russia, the West, and Europe’s Grey Zone, a DGAP co-publication
by Daniel Hamilton, Stefan Meister
Chapter Two of The Eastern Question: Russia, the West, and Europe’s Grey Zone, co-published by the Center for Transatlantic Relations, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University and the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP), 2016, 264 pp.
Eastern Europe’s future is likely to be shaped in large part by the interplay between the region’s legacy challenges, Putin’s Ozero maxims, and the precepts of the Maidan. Western engagement can make a difference. But Russia’s assertiveness and Ukraine’s tumult come at a time of immense strain on Western countries.
What the West Must Do
What the West Must DoPart II of The Eastern Question Russia, the West, and Europe’s Grey Zone, a DGAP co-publication
by Daniel Hamilton, Stefan Meister
Excerpted from The Eastern Question: Russia, the West, and Europe’s Grey Zone, a new book co-published by the Center for Transatlantic Relations, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University and the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP), 2016, 264 pp. The publication was generously supported by the Robert Bosch Stiftung.
This section of the DGAP's forthcoming co-publication with the Center for Transatlantic Studies at John Hopkins University asks three important questions: What should the West do with Russia? What should the West do with the Common Neighborhood; and What should the West do for itself?
How to Win the Battle for a New Ukraine
How to Win the Battle for a New UkraineReforms, new elites, and old structures
by Iryna Solonenko
DGAPanalyse 4 (May 2016), 11pp.
This April saw the formation of the third Ukrainian government since the Euromaidan protests. Where does Ukraine stand on its path to democratic change? Two years of reform efforts have yielded decidedly mixed results. A battle continues between the old system’s vested interests and reformers pushing hard for a new social contract. Who is winning? And how can external actors help the country, among other things, strengthen political accountability, break monopolies, and fight corruption?
The Thin-Skinned President’s Outrage
German-Turkish relations under pressure over satirical poem
by Julian Rappold
Heinrich Böll Stiftung European Union, April 25, 2016
In a blog entry for the Heinrich Böll Stiftung, Julian Rappold sums up the current debate over the limits of satire in Germany. A controversial poem by German comedian Jan Böhmermann, coming just weeks after Chancellor Merkel's deal with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan to stop the flow of migrants trying to reach Europe, put German-Turkish relations to the test and nearly developed into a state affair.
The Resurfacing Turkish-Kurdish Question and its Regional Impact
The Resurfacing Turkish-Kurdish Question and its Regional ImpactThe Turkish time machine
by Kristian Brakel
DGAPkompakt (April 2016), 6pp.
The bomb that went off in downtown Ankara on March 13, killing 37 people, was a stark reminder that war has returned to Turkey. The second such attack within one month, it clearly shows that the conflict has the capacity to engulf all of Turkey. With the peace process in a shambles and the violent spillover from Syria intensifying, the resurgence of the Turkish-Kurdish conflict almost makes it seem as if the country has traveled back in time to the height of the civil war in the 1990s.
Papers from the Germany-Poland-Russia Trialogue
Papers from the Germany-Poland-Russia Trialogue Three different views on security in Europe
by Stefan Meister, Jana Puglierin, Marek Świerczyński, Alexander Nikitin
DGAPanalyse 3 (April 2016), 13pp, in English
The Germany-Poland-Russia Trialogue Workshop held at the DGAP in December 2015 focused on security. It brought together a group of Russian, Polish, and German experts to discuss their respective national security discourses and the security situation in Europe more generally. The three short papers included here provide brief analyses of how the security situation is currently perceived in each of the three countries.
Moldova at an Impasse
Moldova at an ImpasseThe crisis in the republic is set to continue despite the formation of a new government
by Sarah Pagung
DGAPkompakt 11 (March 2016), 3pp
Corruption and self-interest on the part of Moldova’s political elite are thwarting the development of this small and very poor Eastern European country and its rapprochement with the EU. The EU itself can offer no tenable solutions to the problem. Meanwhile, the public continues to reel from the discovery in December 2014 that as much as a billion euros had vanished from three Moldovan banks. How can the country regain its pro-European course?
The Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood in 2016
The Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood in 2016Scenarios and recommendations
by Abdelrahman Ayyash, Victor J. Willi
DGAPkompakt 9 (March 2016), 6pp
The Egyptian army’s removal of Mohammed Morsi in July 2013 brought major structural transformations to Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood. Today, with thousands of MB leaders and mid-level cadres under arrest, it is nearly impossible for the organization’s leadership to control the movement’s lower ranks. Many rank-and-file members are frustrated with the old guard’s reluctance to advocate a more aggressive stance against the regime, despite its widespread human rights violations.
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