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From Ostpolitik to EU-Russia Interdependence
Germany’s Perspective
by Stefan Meister
Published in "Post-Crimea Shift in EU-Russia Relations: From Fostering Interdependence to Managing Vulnerabilities", 2019, Kristi Raik & András Rácz (eds.)
With the Russian annexation of Crimea and the war in eastern Ukraine, followed by Western sanctions and Russian counter-sanctions, German decision-makers had to learn that economic and energy interdependence not only creates win-win situations but also means vulnerability. The reaction was a shift from the dominance of the economy in German policy on Russia to a securitisation and politicisation of relations with Moscow.
“Europe Is at a Disadvantage”
Judy Dempsey asks Jana Puglierin and other experts about the current political crisis in Germany
by Jana Puglierin
“Judy Asks,” Carnegie Europe Blog, June 6, 2019
As part of her "Strategic Europe" blog for Carnegie Europe's website, Judy Dempsey asked a selection of foreign and security policy experts, including DGAP's Jana Puglierin, about the consequences of Germany’s political crisis for Europe.
Sustaining Multilateralism in a Multipolar World
Sustaining Multilateralism in a Multipolar WorldWhat France and Germany Can Do to Preserve the Multilateral Order
by Claire Demesmay, Claudia Schmucker, Elvire Fabry, Carole Mathieu, Eric-André Martin
Notes du Cerfa, No. 148, Ifri, June 2019, Claire Demesmay, Barbara Kunz, (ed.), 32 pp.
While international multilateralism is under strain, it is vital for France and Germany to defend it, since it is the most appropriate system for preserving their interests – particularly in terms of welfare, security, prosperity and environmental protection. Against this backdrop, three political fields offer opportunities for joint initiatives: trade, conventional arms control and climate change.
Russia and the West 2028
Russia and the West 2028Forward-Looking Scenarios in Russian-European-American-Relations
by
The Center for Transatlantic Relations at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies and the Robert Bosch Center at the German Council on Foreign Relations partnered with the Robert Bosch Foundation to explore Russia-European-American dynamics in a turbulent time. In 2018, we decided in the last project phase to generate a number of scenarios – narratives of alternative futures – that can enable decision-makers to play out the potential ramifications of choices they face today.
The Mystery of Volodymyr Zelenskiy
by Iryna Solonenko
Berlin Policy Journal, April 19, 2019
The comedian has played the president on Ukrainian TV for years. Now he’s likely to be elected to the real office. Who is Volodymyr Zelenskiy, and what or whom does he stand for?
The Next Two Years in EU-U.S. Relations
by Jana Puglierin
In: Transatlantic Security Cooperation Toward 2020, Policy Paper, 25.03.2019, 18 p.
Transatlantic relations have been in a permanent state of emergency since President Donald Trump took office in 2017: for the first time since World War II, a U.S. president is not only calling into question his country’s security guarantee for Europe but also being openly skeptical of, if not hostile to, the EU.
Moldova’s Weak Democracy Is a Growing Risk for Europe
by Cristina Gherasimov
First published as Expert Comment, Chatham House, February 26, 2019
The country’s politics have been captured by a corrupt elite, creating a worrying security risk on the edge of Europe.
Nord Stream 2: The Dead-End of Germany’s Ostpolitik
by Stefan Meister
Berlin Policy Journal, February 20, 2019
The fight about the pipeline was supposed to give Germany cause to rethink its foreign-policy. Instead, Berlin is supporting a project that will hurt its credibility.
Can Slovakia and the Czech Republic overcome Europe’s east-west divide?
by Almut Möller, Milan Nič
ECFR Commentary, February 11, 2019
Prague and Bratislava can jointly develop a more visible profile within the Visegrad 4 group and counter the overall dominance of Hungary and Poland.
Tunisia’s Fragile Democracy: Decentralization, Institution-Building and the Development of Marginalized Regions
Perspectives from the Region and Europe
by Dina Fakoussa, Laura Lale Kabis-Kechrid
Although Tunisia has made great strides over the past seven years, its democratization process remains fragile. Disillusionment with and distrust in the government, particularly high among the young, also manifest themselves in low voter turnout. To a great extent, this disillusionment stems from the various, persistent socio-economic problems which had led to the uprisings and the ouster of the former autocratic regime in 2011.
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