publications

Filter by:


Selected publications

Regional Cooperation in the Western Balkans
Regional Cooperation in the Western BalkansOptions for the Interplay of Neighborly Relations and EU Accession up to 2025
by Cornelius Adebahr, Theresia Töglhofer, Sarah Wohlfeld, Natasha Wunsch
DGAPkompakt 30 (December 2018), 21 pp.
Under the European Commission’s 2018 Western Balkan strategy, candidate countries from the region must resolve bilateral disputes before joining the EU. As it wants to avoid importing conflicts, the EU puts the onus to ensure good neighborly relations onto the region itself. International researchers from this year’s TRAIN program developed scenarios for the region. They range from increasing regional cooperation to the possible fallout from failed conflict resolution or an EU fatigue toward the region.
Hurdle Race with a Slow Start
Hurdle Race with a Slow StartPublic Administration Reform in Ukraine
by Iryna Solonenko
DGAPkompakt 25 (October 2018), 6 pp.
Launched in 2015 after the Revolution of Dignity, Ukraine’s public administration reform is a serious attempt to overhaul the existing system based on recognized European principles. However, its implementation has been patchy due to various obstacles including poor leadership and resistance to change. To tackle these drawbacks, it is important to establish a reform task force led by the prime minster and improve legislation. Support from Germany and Europe will also be decisive for the reform’s success.
Responsible Defense Policy
Responsible Defense PolicyThis Autumn, Germany Should Pave Its Way out of the 46 Billion Defense Investment Gap
by Christian Mölling, Torben Schütz
DGAPkompakt Nr. 23 (October 2018), 6 pp.
By the close of the ongoing budget negotiations in November 2018, Germany will have to decide on the future of its armed forces’ long-term recovery. To close the 46 billion euro gap, the defense budget and financial planning would need to be increased by approximately four billion euros each year until 2024. While endorsing their firm commitments to NATO and the EU, parliament and government have so far failed to agree on a budget fit enough to deliver on those tasks they have assigned to the Bundeswehr.
The Relevance of a Strong Civilian CSDP
The Relevance of a Strong Civilian CSDPHow EU Member States Can Shape the Civilian Crisis Management Agenda 2018 and Beyond
by Carina Böttcher
DGAPkompakt 21 (October 2018), 5 pp.
While member states recognize the value of the civilian Common Security and Defense Policy (CSDP), a strategic EU vision is lacking. In the face of current and future security risks, the EU requires the capacities to launch civilian missions and to manage major crises in its vicinity. To guide the implementation of the Civilian Compact from 2019 on, the EU should set quantitative headline goals and adopt a strategic planning approach, while member states need to create favorable national legislations.
Between Old and New World Order
Between Old and New World OrderRussia’s Foreign and Security Policy Rationale
by Stefan Meister, Pavel Baev, Pavel Felgenhauer, Alexander Golts, Alexander Kolbin, Peter Pomerantsev
DGAPkompakt 19 (September 2018). 30 pp.
Political decision-making under Vladimir Putin is informed by a military-technological rationale, and military might is seen as a main tool of Russian foreign policy. Modern nuclear capabilities are key for Russia as they are regarded an effective bargaining chip that will also bring Moscow back to eye-level vis-à-vis the US. Yet, the Kremlin regards all manners of hybrid warfare – including disinformation, cyber-attacks and Russian-engineered international media coverage – as equally legitimate.
EU Civilian Crisis Management
EU Civilian Crisis ManagementHow the Union Can Live up to Its Ambitions – or Stumble into Irrelevance
by Hannah Neumann, Carina Böttcher, Christian Mölling, Marie Wolf
DGAPkompakt 15 (July 2018), 6 pp.
Europe’s security situation has drastically changed. Current challenges can neither be tackled by member states individually, nor by military means alone. A new ambitious process at EU level gives member states the opportunity to improve the EU’s civilian crisis management and answer central questions. Most importantly though, member states need to increase their financial and personal commitments, if they want to prevent this trademark of European foreign policy from drifting into irrelevance.
Cautiously Ambitious
Cautiously AmbitiousGerman Government Sets the Right Tone for Strong EU Policies
by Daniela Schwarzer
DGAPkompakt 5 (March 2018), 5 pp.
Angela Merkel is set to form a new government as the Social Democrats accepted a coalition with the CDU/CSU. Their coalition deal pushes for closer European integration alongside EU reform and strong German-French relations. It continues the paradigm of post-war German foreign relations by focusing on partnerships. At the same time, this paradigm is under threat: Both the EU and US relations have become less certain. Germany needs to proceed with ambition – and caution. The deal is a good start.
Mind the Gap
Mind the GapHow France and Germany Can Spearhead Joint Foreign Policy Initiatives Now
by Claire Demesmay, Jana Puglierin, Laure Delcour, Barbara Kunz, Stefan Meister, Andreas Rinke, Frédéric Charillon, Laura Lale Kabis-Kechrid, Dorothée Schmid
DGAPkompakt 4b (April 2018), 16 pp., Updated and extended version
Given the current instability on Europe's borders and uncertainty about the international role of the US under President Trump, it is high time for Franco-German foreign policy initiatives. However, differences between the two, both on policy issues and in their strategic cultures, also limit their cooperation. This study shows how France and Germany can bridge - and exploit - these gaps to facilitate joint initiatives on four key topics: Russia, transatlantic relations, Syria and Turkey.
Advancing Energy Transition While on the Road to Democracy
Advancing Energy Transition While on the Road to DemocracyTunisia’s Double Challenge
by Shahrazad Far
DGAPkompakt 2 (January 2018), 4 pp.
The energy transition in Tunisia, which was first initiated in 2009 and reviewed in 2012, has underemphasized related social and political factors, such as employment and citizen participation in the country’s overall transition context. As the country continues on its path of democratization, the process of energy transition should underscore employment, enhance the role of local authorities and conducting energy-relevant surveys and opinion polls.
In the Triple Threat to Tunisia’s Democracy, Corruption is King
In the Triple Threat to Tunisia’s Democracy, Corruption is King
by Fabian Stroetges
DGAPkompakt 1 (January 2018), 6 pp.
As austerity protestors clash with security forces in Tunisia, the country’s young democracy is threatened by a triple challenge: Insecurity, a lack of socioeconomic development and persistent corruption are interlinked and reinforce each other. Individually and in concert they undermine citizens’ confidence in the democratic system and hamper its ability to produce democracy dividends.
dgap info