EU Civilian Crisis Management
EU Civilian Crisis Management

How the Union Can Live up to Its Ambitions – or Stumble into Irrelevance

26/07/2018 | by Hannah Neumann, Carina Böttcher, Christian Mölling, Marie Wolf | European Union, Security

Europe’s security situation has drastically changed. Current challenges can neither be tackled by member states individually, nor by military means alone. A new ambitious process at EU level gives member states the opportunity to improve the EU’s civilian crisis management and answer central questions. Most importantly though, member states need to increase their financial and personal commitments, if they want to prevent this trademark of European foreign policy from drifting into irrelevance.

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